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Literacy Instruction and PARCC

The Lumberton School District offers daily reading and writing instruction, using the workshop method.  This method was chosen after a careful examination of research findings, because it includes all of the factors that were found to have the biggest impact in student achievement.

Reading workshop delivers all of the following

research-based qualities:

  • Students choose their reading material rather than having the same text assigned to all students.
  • Students read texts that match their level of achievement, which has been proven to be among the most critical factors in speeding reading growth.
  • Students receive instruction based on their needs in a variety of formats: a short whole class minilesson; small group instruction through strategy groups or guided reading; one-to-one conferences with the teacher.
  • Students are involved in deep, meaningful conversations that boost their comprehension, and they extend their thinking by writing about their reading.
  • Students are provided with substantial blocks of time each day to read independently, providing the large amount of reading practice that is needed for growth.

Important things to Know:

The units of study being implemented at each grade are designed to develop literacy skills that meet or exceed the Common Core expectations.  The curriculum should more than adequately develop the skills students will need to meet the standards for their grade level that will be tested on the PARCC exam.  At the same time, our model of instruction meets each student where he or she is and focuses on growth toward the end-of-grade goals.  This results in differentiated instruction that helps all students improve, no matter their starting point.

In Reading Workshop, your child will:

  •  be immersed in units of study designed to meet the Common CoreState Standards.  These will involve minilessons that last about 10-15 minutes each day followed by independent reading time.
  • be reading for 20 or more minutes a day, using books of his or her choice at the appropriate level.
  • engage in conversations about books with reading partners, book club members, and at times, the whole class.
  •  hear a read-aloud as part of his or her regular experience.  The read-aloud will provide an opportunity for your child to practice the skills and strategies he or she is learning, with teacher support and guidance.
  • read one-on-one with the teacher on a regular basis and discuss the strategies he or she is using to support deep comprehension..  The teacher will use this time to evaluate your child’s progress, determine his/her needs, and teach him/her something specifically designed to help him/her grow as a reader.
  • Through the conferring process, work with the teacher to set learning goals specific to his or her needs and work together toward achievement of those goals.
  • learn skills for successfully reading both fiction and nonfiction.

 

In Writing Workshop, your child will:

  • be immersed in units of study designed to meet the new Common Core Standards. These will involve minilessons that last about 10-15 minutes each day followed by independent writing time.
  • be writing for 20 or more minutes a day on topics of his/her own choice within the genre being studied at the time.
  • study the craft of writing in the three main areas of the Common Core: informational, opinion/argument, and narrative.
  • study “mentor texts” by known authors that demonstrate the craft techniques the teacher is sharing with the students.
  • have conferences with the teacher on a regular basis. The teacher will use this time to evaluate your child’s progress, determine his/her needs, and teach him/her something specifically designed to help him/her grow as a writer.
  • be involved in setting goals for his/her growth as a writer and will receive clear and specific feedback regarding progress toward those goals.
  • receive instruction planned especially for your child based on a pre-assessment in each area of writing as well as ongoing observations and examination of the child’s writing in the classroom.
  • use a writer’s notebook or folder to collect ideas for topics and to write daily entries for practice of the skills and strategies being learned.
  • be given many opportunities to share his/her writing with an audience, whether it be classmates, peers from other classrooms, school personnel, family members, or community members. This will help your child to understand the connection between a writer and his or her audience.

 


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